Field of Privilege: Why Instructional Design and Technology Must Engage Issues of Race, Ethnicity, and Social Justice

This video is a re-creation of a presentation delivered in November 2014, at the Annual Conference of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology. The APA reference for that original presentation is

Bradshaw, A.C. (2014). Field of Privilege: Why Instructional Design and Technology must Engage Issues of Race, Ethnicity, and Social Justice. Presentation at the annual conference of the Association for Education Communication and Technology, Jacksonville, FL.

The full length video is 22 minutes long. For your convenience, the video has been divided into three parts. Parts 1 and 2 include links to the next part, at the end of the video.

Each of the three parts has a corresponding Reflective Study Guide.
You are encouraged to download and read through the reflective study guides prior to watching each segment, and to process your thoughts by writing or typing on the study guide prior to continuing with the next part. If you cannot view all three parts in one sitting, it will be helpful to briefly review the reflective study guide for the previous segment before continuing.


Part 1 
(6:24)   Reflective Study Guide for Part 1 is HERE.



Part 2  (9:09)   Reflective Study Guide for Part 2 is  HERE.



Part 3
 
(6:51)   Reflective Study Guide for Part 3 is HERE.





References

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Bray, B., McGovern, C. & Pedroni, L. (2007). Instructional Development Timeline. Retrieved April 20, 2011, from My eCoach Web site:  http://idtimeline.my-ecoach.com

Bruner, J. (1996). The culture of education. Boston, MA: Harvard Univ. Press.

Code, L. (1993). Taking Subjectivity into Account. In Feminist epistemologies, ed. Linda Alcoff and Elizabeth Potter, 15–48. New York: Routledge.

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Greene, M. (1988). Dialectic of freedom. New York: Teachers College Press.

Harding, S. (1991). Whose science? Whose knowledge? Thinking from women’s lives. Ithica, NY: Cornell University Press.

Keller, C.O. & Bradshaw, A.C. (2006). Conscientização and the Culture of Fear: Critical Consciousness Education as a Path to Media Literacy. Presentation at the annual conference of the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco, CA.

McIntosh, P. (1988). White privilege: Unpacking the invisible knapsack. Excerpted in Working Paper 189, White privilege and male privilege: A personal account of coming to see correspondences through work in women’s studies, Wellesley, MA: Wellesley College Center for Research on Women.

Mills, C. (1997). The racial contract. Ithica, NY: Cornell University Press.

Januszewski, A. & Molenda, M. (Eds.) (2008). Educational technology: A definition with commentary. New York: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Seels, B.B. & Richey, R.C. (1994). Instructional technology: the definition and domains of the field. Bloomington, IN: Association for Educational Communications and Technology.

Zinn, H. (1969). The Case for Radical Change, in Saturday Review, Oct 18. pp.81-82, 94-95.




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